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18May/130

Remote VNC Access

VNC Access to Raspberry Pi

 

There's nothing quite like being 500 miles from home and having the ability to control your home computer with your cell phone. In the past, I have used PocketCloud in conjunction with the built in RDP server to access my Windows 7 computer.  It was pretty handy for managing my media library from work or my laptop.

I ran into a problem, though, once I completely moved my home computers to Linux: the best RDP server solution for Linux (xRDP) just didn't cut it. It was nowhere near as seamless as the built in utilities for Windows, and I don't like fiddling past initial setup.

I decided my Raspberry Pi would make a great remote access point. No sensitive information, very low power draw for 24/7 uptime, and I can tuck it in next to my router so I never have to see it.

Join me after the break for a quick and easy tutorial for enabling remote access to your own Linux machine! We'll be using TightVNC Server for Linux, a Raspberry Pi running Raspbian, and your choice of a VNC client.

23Oct/126

Custom Launchers in Ubuntu 12.04 LTS

I know that I'm straying into Lifehacker territory here, but this is a tip I couldn't help but share. I've always wanted to create customer launchers for the Unity dock, and I've finally found how. I'm going to apply this to Minecraft, but you can use to create an icon for just about any program or command that you might need to run in Ubuntu. Read on for instructions...

25Aug/122

Encrypted Web Browsing With SSH and Ubuntu

Every now and then, you may be forced to use an unencrypted wireless access point to access the internet. Many hotels and coffee shops leave their access points unencrypted, instead relying on other solutions such as captive portals to authenticate customers. This keeps unauthorized users off the network (sort of), but it doesn't encrypt anything between you and the access point. This could allow a malicious hacker to intercept personal information, such as passwords. With an SSH server at home, you can encrypt your web traffic and slingshot it back to your house. Your SSH server will then decrypt it and send it back out to the internet, as if you were browsing from inside your secure home network. Interested? Read on.

4May/111

VirtualBox and MySQL Goodies!

As a web dev, we require systems to handle our testing in as realistically a way as possible.  Because I'm stuck in a Windows environment, I determined that a taste of Debian in a VirtualBox virtual machine would perform as an ideal testing environment.  Going about and installing VirtualBox was painless, and so was getting Debian installed through the ISO.

Up until now, I had been using bridging for my internet access using the host machines connection but the virtual machine getting it's own IP address from the physical network.  This made updating and installing through apt easy.  I quickly discovered that mobility would be an issue though.  As my laptop changed networks, it would get a new IP from that physical network.  The rub came in when trying to keep Dreamweaver updated with the virtual machine's IP address.  The developers working with Sun (now Oracle) had a feature called Host-only Networking which does exactly as the name describes.  The host machine makes a virtual connection and includes itself and the virtual machines in a network logically separate from the outside world.  This keeps the machine from changing networks (and thus IPs) wherever I go!  Great in theory, but didn't work upon implementation.